Review on jeffery archer a prison diary

Where Jeff-in-Hell showed promising signs of becoming Everyman, Jeff-in-Purgatory turns out to be Mr Pooter: 'Certainly,' he writes on 25 August'incarceration is something to be added to one's experience. Archer interacted more in this prison with those inmates who could obtain for him goods and services not formally permitted by the authorities, like extra BT phone-cards.

jeffrey archer books review

It was here that he apparently encountered another character inspiring a short story in Cat O'Nine TalesMaestro. No: he's going to get even. As a celebrity whose ups and downs are reported in the Sun, and as a millionaire who can afford to have his daily jottings typed up every 10 days by Alison and sent to his long-suffering literary agent, he is not your average category-C prisoner.

Indeed, the most vivid pictures in Jeff's diary are the glossy reproductions of the pencil sketches made by Shaun, another inmate. With a few more pictures, it might even have made a nice piece in Hello!

Jeffrey archer prisoner number

A minor breach of conditions during a home visit resulted in Archer being sent to B-Category HMP Lincoln for 22 days - described in a section of the book subtitled "Back to Hell". They may not be literary giants, but they know how to tell a whopping great story. Lord Archer describes himself as a man completely free of prejudices, and I do not think he is mistaken in this. His lack of prejudice, though, derives from an absence of a point of view, rather than from broadmindedness. But no, Jeff's saving that for volume three. When he makes a general judgment, for example about the connection between drug-taking and criminality, it is invariably unimaginative and unilluminating. The first published volume of his prison diaries , subtitled "Hell", covered his three weeks in Belmarsh High Security Prison.

He is a kind of Tony Blair with the messianism bleached out. Lord Archer's one admirable quality is his resilience. The rules are more relaxed, but as the title suggests, boredom is the main enemy for all prisoners, not just Archer.

All at once, life in Wayland has a purpose. It is odd, in a way, that he ever went in for writing books, and odder still that he should have been so successful at it. He seems to be indestructible: and his relations in Wayland with a Colombian called Sergio are symptomatic of his capacity to turn any situation to his own advantage.

Jeff's resilience in the face of adversity is what he wants to advertise to the Tory faithful, for whom 'character' has always been more important than integrity.

He writes like a person a quarter of his age, as if for a school magazine.

Review on jeffery archer a prison diary

It was here that he apparently encountered another character inspiring a short story in Cat O'Nine Tales , Maestro. He emphasizes how ineffective prison bureaucracy is, especially how the hierarchy works or rather does not work, for example a number of personnel each claiming to be governor. Jeff's erstwhile colleagues in the upper house will find it instructive to see how he measures up to the challenge of chokey, and Jeff's diary gives his readers a clear idea of how he will be conducting himself in the future. Archer interacted more in this prison with those inmates who could obtain for him goods and services not formally permitted by the authorities, like extra BT phone-cards. They write better in prison, he is reported to have said. Indeed, the most vivid pictures in Jeff's diary are the glossy reproductions of the pencil sketches made by Shaun, another inmate. His lack of prejudice, though, derives from an absence of a point of view, rather than from broadmindedness. Belmarsh: Hell was fuelled by Jeff's indignation at his treatment 'This is not Turkey, not Nigeria, not Kosovo,' he spluttered and although it was neither De Profundis nor Pilgrim's Progress it held out the intriguing prospect that a few months in the nick was going to do for Jeff's prose what 30 years of 'editing', followed by dinner at the Caprice, had never managed to achieve. Wayland eludes Jeff's pen because he so plainly has another, outside, life to lead. He is a kind of Tony Blair with the messianism bleached out. Jeff's resilience in the face of adversity is what he wants to advertise to the Tory faithful, for whom 'character' has always been more important than integrity. Although Archer spent less than a month there, Belmarsh is described as a real hell-hole. Thin on the human side of doing time, Jeff's diary is positively threadbare when it comes to his favourite subject: himself.
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Review: Memoir/media: A Prison Diary by Jeffrey Archer