Children poisonous plant

They are also commonly known a elephant's ears and angel's Wings.

honesty plant poisonous

Photo: iStock 9. If you need to go to hospital, try to take a piece of the plant with you for identification purposes.

Poisonous garden plants

Caladiums provide a variety of colors, including red, pink, and white, which makes them an attractive addition to collections of greenery. Cats and dogs: It can cause excessive salivation, pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Photo: iStock 8. Mistletoe It may be a universal symbol of joy and good cheer, but this holiday favorite is actually on the list of poisonous plants. Diarrhea may last for three to six days. Published October Chillies If your child puts a chilli in her mouth or touches one then rubs her eyes, it could be uncomfortable or even painful. These plants are mainly found in warm climates or in coastal gardens. All parts of the tree are toxic but the small yellow fruit are more commonly eaten by children. In rare instances, it can produce a dermatological reaction, but is mainly toxic only if ingested. All parts of the caldadium are considered toxic to humans and animals. Some plants may cause skin irritation, itching, a rash or blisters. But keep in mind, these poisonous plants can irritate the mouth and throat and even cause nausea or vomiting when swallowed. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a fungi, but are included in this list as they cause the most hospitalisations. Azalea Thanks to their stunning, colorful blooms, azaleas decorate many home lawns and gardens.

An overview of poisonous plants. Stinging trees eg Dendrocnide excelsa and Dendrocnide moroides Contact with the leaves will cause severe stinging which can last for days to months.

poisonous house plants

Remove wild mushrooms promptly if they are growing in your garden. Dieffenbachia The Dieffenbachia is also called dumb cane. In rare instances, it can produce a dermatological reaction, but is mainly toxic only if ingested.

Rated 9/10 based on 113 review
Download
Dangerous & poisonous plants: child safety