A character analysis of huck in the novel the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain

huckleberry finn character analysis

Jim's insight is also revealed when he recognizes the duke and the king to be frauds. Jim's actions, no doubt, are partly a result of his inability to distance himself from the society in which he has been conditioned.

jim huckleberry finn

Even Tom Sawyer, the St. The one trait that does not fluctuate throughout the novel is Jim's belief in Huck.

Huck finn character traits quotes

Their adventures together, along with Huck's solo adventures, comprise the core of the book. He was ignorant, unwashed, insufficiently fed; but he had as good a heart as ever any boy had. Read an in-depth analysis of Tom Sawyer. Sleeping on doorsteps when the weather is fair, in empty hogsheads during storms, and living off of what he receives from others, Huck lives the life of a destitute vagabond. Huck simply reports what he sees, and the deadpan narration allows Twain to depict a realistic view of common ignorance, slavery, and the inhumanity that follows. When Huck declares, "All right, then, I'll go to hell," he refuses his place in society and heaven, and the magnitude of his decision is what solidifies his role as a heroic figure. Because Jim is a black man and a runaway slave, he is at the mercy of almost all the other characters in the novel and is often forced into ridiculous and degrading situations.

Read an in-depth analysis of Tom Sawyer. These qualities are not altered during the course of the novel; instead, they are fleshed out and prove to be positives instead of negatives. This novel is a tool that Mark Twain, whose real name was Samuel Langhorne Clemmons, was using to impress the great benefits of friendship upon society.

Many scholars have argued about Huck Finn being prejudiced.

huckleberry finn character description

It is important to note, however, that Huck himself never laughs at the incongruities he describes. And as his society was forbidden us by our parents the prohibition trebled and quadrupled its value, and therefore we sought and got more of his society than any other boy's.

Inspiration[ edit ] The character of Huck Finn is based on Tom Blankenship, the real-life son of a sawmill laborer and sometime drunkard named Woodson Blankenship, who lived in a "ramshackle" house near the Mississippi River behind the house where the author grew up in Hannibal, Missouri.

As the novel progresses, this nature reveals itself as complete faith and trust in his friends, especially Huck.

The adventures of huckleberry finn summary

Aunt Polly appears at the end of the novel and properly identifies Huck, who has pretended to be Tom, and Tom, who has pretended to be his own younger brother, Sid. His response was, "One soul inhabiting two bodies. Jim does not want Huck to suffer through the pain of seeing his dead father, and this moment establishes Jim as a father figure to Huck. When Huck and Jim come upon the dead man on the floating house, Jim warns Huck not to look at the man's face. Pap Finn is Huck's abusive, drunken father who shows up at the beginning of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and forcibly takes his son to live with him. The gesture is kind, but when readers learn later that the man was Pap Finn, they realize the affection Jim has for Huck. Characterization[ edit ] Huckleberry "Huck" Finn is the son of the town's vagrant drunkard, "Pap" Finn.

Another possible inspiration for Jim came from Twain's relationship with John Lewis, a tenant farmer at Quarry farm. Read an in-depth analysis of Pap.

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Character Analysis